Free Non-Trial for Apps

On Friday, both Per and HoneyJar were made free for a limited time.

 
Yeah, we don't really need Per to tell us which option is the better deal.

Yeah, we don't really need Per to tell us which option is the better deal.

 

Developers can't offer free trials to their customers on the App Store, and customers aren't always willing to commit dollars to new apps. That's normal. Even though most apps cost less than a cup of coffee, at least a cup of coffee is something that people know and understand—everyone knows what a cup of coffee offers and can easily decide if it's worth the price.

Apps—especially new, unrated apps from lesser-known companies and developers—don't necessarily have that kind of obvious value. Sure, you can check the app's website, or watch a cool preview video on its App Store page, but most people just won't invest that kind of time and effort.

 
HoneyJar shows us that the real cost of downloading a free app is... nothing.

HoneyJar shows us that the real cost of downloading a free app is... nothing.

 

It's not a sustainable business model in any way, so it won't happen often (if ever), but by making apps free for a short period of time—in this case, one week—people get a chance to try them with no commitment.

It's the next best thing to a free trial.

Enjoy!

On the App Store, developers can't hear you scream.

A note if you're leaving a review for any app on the App Store:

  • Reviews are very helpful for letting the world know what you think of an app. Additionally, the more reviews an app gets, the higher it ranks when someone searches the App Store, which improves its visibility and "discoverability".
  • Developers of the app can't reply to your reviews. So, if your review contains some kind of support request ("the app crashes when I do X"), the developer can't get in touch with you to help.
  • Developers must provide a support link when they submit an app to the App Store. This should ideally provide you with a way to contact them (we include a link to our contact page), or at the very least link to an FAQ (frequently-asked questions—Per's website includes a direct link).

If you need help, or if you have an idea for how a developer can make their app even better, the support link is the best way to be heard.